Office CultureProject ManagementVisual Communication

How Visual Communication in the Workplace Can Transform Your Company

By October 15, 2019 No Comments
Visual communication in the workplace and company updates

Companies that excel at design outperform average industry growth by as much as 2 to 1, according to a report by McKinsey & Company. But did you know that the visual communication strategies you use to capture external audiences can also transform your company from the inside out? Effective communication in the workplace is in fact a primary driver of a company’s success. 

And that’s where visual communication comes in. In fact, 93% of internal communication pros say creativity is important in their role.

Visual communication in the workplace stat

Visuals can improve corporate communication and company performance by: 

  • Streamlining HR processes
  • Elevating messages from leadership
  • Increasing company-wide collaboration

Let’s take a deeper look at the many advantages of visual communication in the workplace. We’ll also explain how to implement a visual-first approach in your organization. 

Why Your HR Department Needs Visual Communication

Operational consistency is vital for large organizations and agile startups alike, and your HR department plays a key role. Whether onboarding new hires through a visual training program or keeping employees updated on policy and benefits information, HR departments need to be deploy effective visual communication. 

Employee handbooks offer an early opportunity for visual communication in the workplace. Try incorporating the look and feel of your brand into the handbook, and use illustrations and icons that echo your company’s specific work culture. These visual elements will make it easier for employees to absorb and retain the information. 

Visual communication strategies for designers

Visual Communication Sharpens Employee Skills

For your company to stay competitive, it’s essential that employees learn and retain new skills. Your organization may already be using online learning to train employees, but without visual communication, training may not be making the impact you want.

Corporate communication training stat

When it comes to HR training sessions and the communication of benefits information, you want to make sure your employees will remember what they’ve learned. Try designing an interactive training program that incorporates visual content such as motion graphics, videos, and infographics.

If it feels like employee skills training keeps “wearing off,” try creating a visual-based interactive training experience. Use elements like scrolling, ranking priorities, and selecting responses to keep trainees engaged. And be sure to tie everything together with an eye-catching visual theme. When quality design and interactivity work together, your employees can learn faster and retain more of what they see.

Visual Communication Strategies for Leadership

The quality of your company’s design — including the quality of visual communication materials disseminated in the workplace — affects your bottom line. And transformation starts at the top. Companies that treat design as a top-management issue are more likely to operate smoothly and see financial success. 

What does this mean for your organization? In short, it represents an opportunity that your competitors don’t know how to capitalize on. At the leadership level, design decisions are often relegated to a spur-of-the-moment whim or a gut feeling:

Corporate communication leadership stat

When design is treated only as the responsibility of a certain department, missed opportunities abound. In fact, many leaders recognize a gap in their own ability to use and evaluate design:

Visual communication design in the workplace stats

So how can you make design a top priority? Start by setting a higher bar for corporate communication. Companies that combine design and business leadership, along with other key design strategies, see up to 75% higher total returns to shareholders, according to the McKinsey report.

C-suite executives might try delivering their next company-wide email in the form of an embedded infographic. For major announcements about a new company value, strategy, or product, a motion graphic can increase create excitement and keep everyone focused on common goals. 

When senior executives champion the use of internal and external visual communication, more departments will start to adopt the Visual-First Method

How to Prioritize Visual Communication Training in the Workplace

To achieve your company’s full potential, you’ll need to pursue a fully visual-driven internal communication strategy in the workplace. But where should you begin? Here are some key first steps: 

  • Organize a company-wide visual communication training event 
  • Brainstorm with stakeholders to identify opportunities for visual communication
  • Form a partnership with a trusted expert in visual strategy 
  • Measure design performance and iterate strategy

When design becomes a priority for everyone, from the new hire to the C-suite executive, your bottom line will show the difference.

Sheridan Prince

Author Sheridan Prince

Sheridan Prince is a content editor for Killer Visual Strategies. She grew up in Indianola, WA, often exploring the woods with a book in her backpack instead of a map. She has a BA in English Writing, a collection of beloved plants, and a passion for concise, evocative communication in all forms. Before joining Killer, Sheridan worked as a content strategist in the sphere of higher education, and as the editor in chief of a journal for emerging authors and artists in the Chicago area. As part of the Killer team, she believes that the keys to crafting powerful stories and forming strong client relationships are to ask the right questions and listen well. On the weekends, she gets her creative fix from watercolor painting and floristry, and gets her fresh air by gardening, hiking the outdoors and learning about the native flora and fauna of the Pacific Northwest.

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